The Importance of Journaling

By: Briani Questelles


Photo by: Anika Holinski

There is a new wave of self-care that is ironically not really new at all, casual journaling. Diary-keeping has been around for decades and is often shown in popular media. While it is great for self-care and meditation it has been given a new purpose thanks to the coronavirus.


Since the first outbreak of coronavirus to now, our world has changed significantly. Journaling during this time is a great way to make yourself a part of history. Believe it or not, your daily struggles and complaints may actually be of interest to many historians in the coming decades.


Journaling is an art form as old as writing itself and it can be argued that every bit of a person's journal is essential for understanding them as a person, the time period they live in, their culture and the worries and doubts of the time.


With the rise of coronavirus, many people are starting to realize that the world they live in isn't what they thought it was. Hospitals are running low on supplies, there is a newfound appreciation for essential workers, world leaders being overwhelmed, protests are occurring to reopen the economy, the list goes on.

Tips on How to Start Journaling:


Journaling is a personal activity that many use to relieve stress and reflect on their lives. Similar to how there are many different types of people, there are many different types of journaling styles.


“Some people go all out for their journals but I don't really care that much,” said frequent journaler 19-year-old Nicole Ramos.


A journal can be dressed up or down as much as the writer seems fit. It is important to remember that your journal is for you, and can be personalized to fit your character.


It may take a while to find a journaling style that is right for you, and the thought of journaling as often as every day may be daunting on most, but journaling does not have to be a daily thing.


“I try to describe the situation for me to later remember everything,” said 20-year-old Anika Holinski. Her journal is a personal memory holder and she writes in it every few weeks to a month.



Things you can write about to get you started:


How was your day?


What made this day special?


Where are you now, physically and mentally?


What are your plans for the future/ future goals


Write a letter to yourself 6 months to a year in the future


Your opinion: social issues, celebrities, political policies


Write a letter to your younger self


Write about your favorite things


If you're looking for journaling prompts many YouTubers and influencers are participating in 30-day journaling challenges.

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PSGA Bylaws (August 2018), Student Bill of Rights, Section B. Freedom of Speech, Press and Inquiry


Neither the student government nor any faculty or administrative person or board shall make a rule or regulation or take any action which abridges students’ freedom of speech, press or inquiry, as guaranteed Constitutional rights as citizens of the United States. Students of the campus are guaranteed:

  1.  the right to examine and discuss all questions of interest to them, and to express opinion privately and publicly;

  2. the right to learn in the spirit of free inquiry;

  3. the right to be informed of the purposes of all research in which they are expected or encouraged to participate either as subject or researcher;

  4. the right to freedom from censorship in campus newspapers and other media 

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